WELCOME TO THE CFZ BLOG NETWORK: COME AND JOIN THE FUN

Half a century ago, Belgian Zoologist Bernard Heuvelmans first codified cryptozoology in his book On the Track of Unknown Animals.

The Centre for Fortean Zoology (CFZ) are still on the track, and have been since 1992. But as if chasing unknown animals wasn't enough, we are involved in education, conservation, and good old-fashioned natural history! We already have three journals, the largest cryptozoological publishing house in the world, CFZtv, and the largest cryptozoological conference in the English-speaking world, but in January 2009 someone suggested that we started a daily online magazine! The CFZ bloggo is a collaborative effort by a coalition of members, friends, and supporters of the CFZ, and covers all the subjects with which we deal, with a smattering of music, high strangeness and surreal humour to make up the mix.

It is edited by CFZ Director Jon Downes, and subbed by the lovely Lizzy Bitakara'mire (formerly Clancy), scourge of improper syntax. The daily newsblog is edited by Corinna Downes, head administratrix of the CFZ, and the indexing is done by Lee Canty and Kathy Imbriani. There is regular news from the CFZ Mystery Cat study group, and regular fortean bird news from 'The Watcher of the Skies'. Regular bloggers include Dr Karl Shuker, Dale Drinnon, Richard Muirhead and Richard Freeman.The CFZ bloggo is updated daily, and there's nothing quite like it anywhere else. Come and join us...

Search This Blog

WATCH OUR MONTHLY WEBtv SHOW

SUPPORT OTT ON PATREON

SUPPORT OTT ON PATREON
Click on this logo to find out more about helping CFZtv and getting some smashing rewards...

SIGN UP FOR OUR MONTHLY NEWSLETTER



Unlike some of our competitors we are not going to try and blackmail you into donating by saying that we won't continue if you don't. That would just be vulgar, but our lives, and those of the animals which we look after, would be a damn sight easier if we receive more donations to our fighting fund. Donate via Paypal today...




Monday, October 22, 2012

OLL LEWIS: Yesterday's News Today



On this day in 1910 Dr Crippen, the first criminal to be apprehended using wireless communications, was sentenced to death. Crippen, in reality not a doctor but a salesman of homoeopathic medicine is thought to have poisoned his wife and burred her in quicklime under his cellar before moving his lover in to his house. The police were first allerted to the fact that something was amiss by a famed circus strong woman known as Vulcana who was a friend of Crippen's wife. Since the verdict, and Crippen's execution, several people have expressed their doubts about Dr Crippen's guilt including Raymond Chandler who thought it was odd that Crippen would take care to dispose of his wifes head, arms and legs but preserve her torso in the cellar (this could be explained by the quicklime getting wet and becoming slaked lime which acts as a preservative). Recent DNA evidence has also thrown doubt on whether the remains found were that of Crippen's wife, however as Crippen's lover claimed in the 1930s that he had told her he killed his wife, I'm willing to bet that any discrepency in the DNA is due to contamination of the sample, which was never kept under sterile conditions by Scotland Yard.

And now the news:


  • Sea Turtles Make Strong Showing in Florida
  • Why Aren't Insects Human-Size?
  • Mussels' Stickiness May Lead to Smarter Medical Gl...
  • Solar Power Used to Study Elephants in Africa
  • Bowhead Whales: Ancient DNA Sheds Light On Arctic ...
  • Albino squirrel in Minnesota
  • Baby Beaver Is Boost to Reintroduced Wild Populati...
  • Happy ending for Boris the cat
  • India’s Supreme Court lifts tiger tourism ban
  • Conservation groups seek changes at wind farm
  • Fareham youngster earns an RSPB award
  • Trainer says Marineland whale has been bleeding si...
  • Extinction from Global Warming: Changing Interacti...
  • Shark Social Networking: Shark Migrations Studied ...
  • Rare albino echidna gets new home in Australia

  • Here's a related song by the author Robert Rankin:

    No comments: