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Half a century ago, Belgian Zoologist Bernard Heuvelmans first codified cryptozoology in his book On the Track of Unknown Animals.

The Centre for Fortean Zoology (CFZ) are still on the track, and have been since 1992. But as if chasing unknown animals wasn't enough, we are involved in education, conservation, and good old-fashioned natural history! We already have three journals, the largest cryptozoological publishing house in the world, CFZtv, and the largest cryptozoological conference in the English-speaking world, but in January 2009 someone suggested that we started a daily online magazine! The CFZ bloggo is a collaborative effort by a coalition of members, friends, and supporters of the CFZ, and covers all the subjects with which we deal, with a smattering of music, high strangeness and surreal humour to make up the mix.

It is edited by CFZ Director Jon Downes, and subbed by the lovely Lizzy Bitakara'mire (formerly Clancy), scourge of improper syntax. The daily newsblog is edited by Corinna Downes, head administratrix of the CFZ, and the indexing is done by Lee Canty and Kathy Imbriani. There is regular news from the CFZ Mystery Cat study group, and regular fortean bird news from 'The Watcher of the Skies'. Regular bloggers include Dr Karl Shuker, Dale Drinnon, Richard Muirhead and Richard Freeman.The CFZ bloggo is updated daily, and there's nothing quite like it anywhere else. Come and join us...

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Monday, May 10, 2010

LOOK WHAT JUST TURNED UP IN MY YOUTUBE EMAIL

Killarney lake


Dear Jon,


I am a student of English and History and am approaching my final year of third level education at the University of Limerick. I am composing this email in accordance to your video which claims to capture an unknown creature in Muckross lake.


I have many relatives in Killarney and the surrounding villages and I have spent many summers by the lakes fishing. The video which you have uploaded, as intriguing and entertaining as it is, I feel does not paint the true picture of the animals that dwell in the lake. I have seen them myself on several occasions in a much more secluded lake. The lake of which I am referring to is Lough Bran.

From what I have seen the animal is much like what you have described, its constitution is very similar to that of a large eel approximately 18 feet long. Its back is a dark muddy colour from its head to its tail and its underbelly is milky white. It has two short stumpy appendages sprouted from the top of its head. I do not believe that the Loch Ness monster still exists nor, if it did, it is a plesiosaur-like animal. I believe this creature is some form of large eel or snail that can travel over land from lake to river to lake as it pleases.


My relatives and I all agree that this animal me be dwindling away for a reason we do not know. I feel that if a major effort is not made to try to document these animals once and for all, then soon our chance will be gone. I hope that this email will be of some use to you. I am not sure if the footage of the Muckross lake shows one of these elusive animals or if is simply birds but I do know that they do live in the lakes and that they are still there, for how long more, I do not know.


Kind regards,


J.M

Happy hunting!

3 comments:

Dale Drinnon said...

The two appendages on the head still sound like the ears of the master-otter, and are diagnostic of the type.

I also do not "Believe in the Loch Ness Monster" but I am afraid our correspondant would fail to grasp the importance of what I mean by that statement. Plesiosaur-shaped creatures are indeed (rarely) reported there, and similar reports occur throughout recorded history and worldwide. There is no good reason to gainsay the entire category on a matter of "belief." There is also no reason to call any such a creature "The Loch Ness Monster" even if one should happen to be in Loch Ness any more than a large eel, seal or otter in that same lake should be called by that same name. Using the name gives the false impression that there is only a single underlying cause for all the reports, and that is a most decidely untrue assumption.

RuhRyan said...

I believe you.

RuhRyan said...

Also, if you don't mind, would you mind being more specific w. the location of Lough Bran