WELCOME TO THE CFZ BLOG NETWORK: COME AND JOIN THE FUN

Half a century ago, Belgian Zoologist Bernard Heuvelmans first codified cryptozoology in his book On the Track of Unknown Animals.

The Centre for Fortean Zoology (CFZ) are still on the track, and have been since 1992. But as if chasing unknown animals wasn't enough, we are involved in education, conservation, and good old-fashioned natural history! We already have three journals, the largest cryptozoological publishing house in the world, CFZtv, and the largest cryptozoological conference in the English-speaking world, but in January 2009 someone suggested that we started a daily online magazine! The CFZ bloggo is a collaborative effort by a coalition of members, friends, and supporters of the CFZ, and covers all the subjects with which we deal, with a smattering of music, high strangeness and surreal humour to make up the mix.

It is edited by CFZ Director Jon Downes, and subbed by the lovely Lizzy Bitakara'mire (formerly Clancy), scourge of improper syntax. The daily newsblog is edited by Corinna Downes, head administratrix of the CFZ, and the indexing is done by Lee Canty and Kathy Imbriani. There is regular news from the CFZ Mystery Cat study group, and regular fortean bird news from 'The Watcher of the Skies'. Regular bloggers include Dr Karl Shuker, Dale Drinnon, Richard Muirhead and Richard Freeman.The CFZ bloggo is updated daily, and there's nothing quite like it anywhere else. Come and join us...

Search This Blog

WATCH OUR MONTHLY WEBtv SHOW

BUT THERE IS MORE...

In between each episode of OTT, we now present OTTXtra. Here are the last three episodes:



SUPPORT OTT ON PATREON

SUPPORT OTT ON PATREON
Click on this logo to find out more about helping CFZtv and getting some smashing rewards...

SIGN UP FOR OUR MONTHLY NEWSLETTER



Unlike some of our competitors we are not going to try and blackmail you into donating by saying that we won't continue if you don't. That would just be vulgar, but our lives, and those of the animals which we look after, would be a damn sight easier if we receive more donations to our fighting fund. Donate via Paypal today...




Thursday, March 12, 2020

BIG CAT ROUND UP

The hunt for British Big Cats attracts far more newspaper-column inches than any other cryptozoological subject. 

There are so many of them now that we feel that they should be archived by us in some way, so we are publishing a regular round-up of the stories as they come in. 

The worldwide mystery cat phenomenon (or group of phenomena, if we are to be more accurate) is not JUST about cryptozoology. At its most basic level it is about the relationship between our species and various species of larger cat. That is why sometimes you will read stories here that appear to have nothing to do with cryptozoology but have everything to do with human/big cat interaction. As committed Forteans, we believe that until we understand the nature of these interactions, we have no hope of understanding the truth that we are seeking.



THYLACINES IN THE NEWS


A NOTE ABOUT RELEVANT ADVERTISING: We collect information about the content (including ads) you use across this site and use it to make both ...

O.O.P MACROPOD

Dog walker stunned to find wallaby hopping about in Scottish countryside

A dog walker was left stunned after she came across a wallaby hopping about in the Scottish countryside.


THE LAST WEEK AT THE CFZ-USA BLOG

CFZ-USA

MUIRHEAD'S ,MYSTERIES: Freshwater jellyfish


I found the following on a web site titled A Small Jellyfish conquers the world https://www.aqualog.de/en/blog-en/a-small-jellyfish-conquers-the-world/ "The freshwater jellyfish was first seen in Europe in 1880, at Regent´s Park in London, where this delicate creature, which attains a diameter of only some 2 cm, turned up in a tank housing tropical water lilies. At that time there was far more interest in animals than there is today, and the freshwater jellyfish hit the headlines worldwide. This, the first and only freshwater jellyfish then known, was scientifically described in the same year as it was discovered – twice! – as Craspedacusta sowerbii LANKESTER, 1880 andLimnocodium victoriaALLMANN, 1880. The first name was published somewhat earlier and hence is valid. So the scientific name of the freshwater jellyfish is Craspedacusta sowerbii.
Detective work
But where did this creature appear from so suddenly? It was already known that jellyfishes are no more than the sexually reproductive stage of a polyp. Jellyfishes belong to the phylum Cnidaria and their closest relatives are the sea anemones and corals. Hence the normal habitus of a jellyfish looks like a small sea anemone. This can perhaps best be compared with toadstools and mushrooms. The normal state of these fungi is a network of filaments that live underground. The parts that appear above ground and can be made into tasty dishes (as long as they aren’t poisonous fungi) are only the fruiting bodies, not the fungus itself..".