WELCOME TO THE CFZ BLOG NETWORK: COME AND JOIN THE FUN

Half a century ago, Belgian Zoologist Bernard Heuvelmans first codified cryptozoology in his book On the Track of Unknown Animals.

The Centre for Fortean Zoology (CFZ) are still on the track, and have been since 1992. But as if chasing unknown animals wasn't enough, we are involved in education, conservation, and good old-fashioned natural history! We already have three journals, the largest cryptozoological publishing house in the world, CFZtv, and the largest cryptozoological conference in the English-speaking world, but in January 2009 someone suggested that we started a daily online magazine! The CFZ bloggo is a collaborative effort by a coalition of members, friends, and supporters of the CFZ, and covers all the subjects with which we deal, with a smattering of music, high strangeness and surreal humour to make up the mix.

It is edited by CFZ Director Jon Downes, and subbed by the lovely Lizzy Bitakara'mire (formerly Clancy), scourge of improper syntax. The daily newsblog is edited by Corinna Downes, head administratrix of the CFZ, and the indexing is done by Lee Canty and Kathy Imbriani. There is regular news from the CFZ Mystery Cat study group, and regular fortean bird news from 'The Watcher of the Skies'. Regular bloggers include Dr Karl Shuker, Dale Drinnon, Richard Muirhead and Richard Freeman.The CFZ bloggo is updated daily, and there's nothing quite like it anywhere else. Come and join us...

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Friday, October 21, 2011

ANDREW MAY: Words from the Wild Frontier

News and stories from the remoter fringes of the CFZ blogosphere...

From Nick Redfern's "There's Something in the Woods...":
From CFZ Australia:

A MYSTERY MOTH IN DORSET





http://www.dorsetmothgroup.org.uk/images/2009/False_Mocha_051.jpg

ROBERT SCHNECK COMES TO THE RESCUE

Hi Jon,

I think that nondescript beetle which turned up in Wisconsin is a darkling beetle. A quick look at the Wikipedia article, however, says there are 20,000 species of them (inordinate fondness, etc.), so that's as far as I'm willing to go.

Sincerely,




Robert

FEED THE BIRDS DAY


Feed the Birds DaySaturday 29 October is Feed the Birds Day. Thousands of people will be taking part in their gardens or at one of our fun events. We know many e-news readers feed their garden birds, so this year we're asking you to welcome wildlife by holding a garden dinner party. Read our top five tips to help you host different wildlife in your garden, and watch our 'Come dine with the birds' video to find out more.Take part



Win a Feed the Birds Day kitYou could win a Feed the Birds Day kit, including a nestbox, three types of bird feeder, two bags of bird food, a fluffy bird toy and a pocket guide to birds! Simply take part in our feeding birds quiz, and e-mail us with the correct answers to be in with a chance of winning this fantastic prize. What better way to celebrate Feed the Birds Day?Do the quiz

DALE DRINNON: This is why Out-of-Place Animals of KNOWN Species CANNOT be assumed to be Cryptids.



HAUNTED SKIES: Three editorials from 'Syntonic'


http://hauntedskies.blogspot.com/2011/10/three-editorials-from-syntonic.html

OLL LEWIS: Yesterday's News Today

Yesterday’s News Today
http://cryptozoologynews.blogspot.com/

On this day in 1844 followers of the American preacher William Miller believed the world would end. He was wrong about that as it turned out.
And now the news:

Leaf Litter Ants Advance Case for Rainforest Conse...
Bolivia's Jaguars Set a Record
Salmon Run Up Dead Glacier
Durrell sharing white-footed tamarin knowledge wit...
Rare antlions discovered in Norfolk nature reserve...
Cyprus Bird death toll reaches one million
141% more tuna is traded than is allowed to be cau...

Every time someone predicts the end of the world they get it wrong, presumably they keep trying on the off chance they’ll get it right and look dead clever for all of 5 minutes. Harold Camping for example predicted the end of the world last May and got it wrong, he then claimed that the world would end on the 21st of October this year instead, as in YESTERDAY… Hmm, well that went well didn’t it?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h5KnHUXa8oY&NR=1

WHO'S A PRETTY MYSTERIOUS POLLY, THEN?

What is it with paintings of dodos and red parrots? In a previous ShukerNature post, I investigated the still-unidentified red mystery macaw depicted in a famous painting of the dodo by Flemish artist Roelandt Savery in 1626. Now, I've just discovered a contentious painting popularly assumed (but not confirmed) to be by English painter William Hodges (1744-1797) portraying a dodo, and what do I find also depicted in that painting? You've guessed it – another unidentified red mystery parrot!

Read on...

DALE DRINNON: Rock apes, Bunyips and Plesiosaurs

http://frontiersofzoology.blogspot.com/2011/10/korean-rock-art-bunyips-plesiosaurs.html