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Half a century ago, Belgian Zoologist Bernard Heuvelmans first codified cryptozoology in his book On the Track of Unknown Animals.

The Centre for Fortean Zoology (CFZ) are still on the track, and have been since 1992. But as if chasing unknown animals wasn't enough, we are involved in education, conservation, and good old-fashioned natural history! We already have three journals, the largest cryptozoological publishing house in the world, CFZtv, and the largest cryptozoological conference in the English-speaking world, but in January 2009 someone suggested that we started a daily online magazine! The CFZ bloggo is a collaborative effort by a coalition of members, friends, and supporters of the CFZ, and covers all the subjects with which we deal, with a smattering of music, high strangeness and surreal humour to make up the mix.

It is edited by CFZ Director Jon Downes, and subbed by the lovely Lizzy Bitakara'mire (formerly Clancy), scourge of improper syntax. The daily newsblog is edited by Corinna Downes, head administratrix of the CFZ, and the indexing is done by Lee Canty and Kathy Imbriani. There is regular news from the CFZ Mystery Cat study group, and regular fortean bird news from 'The Watcher of the Skies'. Regular bloggers include Dr Karl Shuker, Dale Drinnon, Richard Muirhead and Richard Freeman.The CFZ bloggo is updated daily, and there's nothing quite like it anywhere else. Come and join us...

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Thursday, December 15, 2011

CRIMSON SPECKLED EMERGES

Some weeks ago I posted that the rare visitor moth, the Crimson Speckled had been bred. Now the Dorset Moth Group has pictures of the adults. Absolutely stunning!

SPONTANEOUS APPLE CREATION OR FRUIT FAFROTSKIE?

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/8956076/Apples-fall-from-the-sky-over-Coventry.html

Yesterday we covered the above story: "Stunned motorists were forced to brake sharply to avoid the falling fruit, believed to be swept up by a vortex caused by freak weather conditions in Coventry".

This following video clip is not only on-topic, but is rather wonderful and is dedicated to Max..

HAUNTED SKIES: Times (The) 9.2.53.


http://hauntedskies.blogspot.com/2011/12/times-9253.html


OLL LEWIS: Yesterday's News Today

http://cryptozoologynews.blogspot.com/

On this day in 1997 Dennō Senshi Porigon was shown on Japanese TV. This resulted in a mass panic event where hundreds of concerned parents thought their children had developed photosensitive epilepsy as a result of watching the show. What actually happened was some children suffered a mild motion sickness akin to when you read a book in a car and were just a little queasy for a minute or two, the Pokémon episode has never been shown on TV elsewhere though as a result.

And now the news:

Apples fall from the sky over Coventry
140 new species described by California Academy of...
Limestone mine exploited, silver gibbons lose thei...
Cull decision is shot in the dark
Maltese hunters arrested for killing birds in UK
Snakes' movement can't outpace global warming, sci...
First green sea turtles hatched in Delaware - Nest...

Here’s the ‘banned’ Pokémon episode, watch it and be a rebel:http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xvh61_electric-soldier-porygon_fun#rel-page-7

A STORY ABOUT GREENLAND SHARKS WITH SOME MASSIVELY IMPRESSIVE IMAGES



http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2073680/Greenland-shark-Fearsome-creature-eats-polar-bears-smiles-camera.html

DALE DRINNON: Chupabats/superbats

I had some leftovers on the ChupaBats as well, and some of the information is important from a historical context. Also I have refined several of the ideas about the zoological nature of the smaller and more common of the Devil Bats involved, which seems to be a new species of the genus Vampyrum.

http://frontiersofzoology.blogspot.com/2011/12/chupabats-superbats.html

ROBERT SCHNECK: Resident Weevil

The other day we posted an appeal from a reader in Panama to identify this weevil. As always, the intrepid Googling of Robert Schneck saved the day. He writes:




Hi Jon,





The festive weevil in the picture is a silky cane weevil, Metamasius hemipterus sericeus (Olivier).
I never heard of it before, but the trick is starting with the plant being attacked and location, so the search terms "heliconia, Panama, weevil" turned up the answer.
http://entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/orn/silky_cane_weevil01a.htm