WELCOME TO THE CFZ BLOG NETWORK: COME AND JOIN THE FUN

Half a century ago, Belgian Zoologist Bernard Heuvelmans first codified cryptozoology in his book On the Track of Unknown Animals.

The Centre for Fortean Zoology (CFZ) are still on the track, and have been since 1992. But as if chasing unknown animals wasn't enough, we are involved in education, conservation, and good old-fashioned natural history! We already have three journals, the largest cryptozoological publishing house in the world, CFZtv, and the largest cryptozoological conference in the English-speaking world, but in January 2009 someone suggested that we started a daily online magazine! The CFZ bloggo is a collaborative effort by a coalition of members, friends, and supporters of the CFZ, and covers all the subjects with which we deal, with a smattering of music, high strangeness and surreal humour to make up the mix.

It is edited by CFZ Director Jon Downes, and subbed by the lovely Lizzy Bitakara'mire (formerly Clancy), scourge of improper syntax. The daily newsblog is edited by Corinna Downes, head administratrix of the CFZ, and the indexing is done by Lee Canty and Kathy Imbriani. There is regular news from the CFZ Mystery Cat study group, and regular fortean bird news from 'The Watcher of the Skies'. Regular bloggers include Dr Karl Shuker, Dale Drinnon, Richard Muirhead and Richard Freeman.The CFZ bloggo is updated daily, and there's nothing quite like it anywhere else. Come and join us...

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Friday, September 10, 2010

RATHER CUTE "MYSTERY LEAFHOPPER". IDENTITY PLEASE

ROBERT SCHNECK: What's Stranger than a Tarsier Muffin?

A baby Wobbegong Shark made from a banana, strawberries, chocolate chip and miniature marshmallow.





MAX SPARREBOOM WRITES

Dear friends and colleagues,

Since a couple of years I am compiling a database with natural history data of all Salamanders of Europe, Asia and Northern Africa (URL below). I am about halfway now and hope to complete the remaining species entries in the course of 2011. I should like to appeal to you for good photographs of salamanders, especially pictures of animals with known collecting localities. After completion I will consider publication in book form and for that purpose high resolution pictures (300 dpi) would be very helpful.

Besides this request for photo's, any comments and suggestions are also most welcome.

All best,

Max Sparreboom

http://science.naturalis.nl/salamanders

ALL THAT GLITTERS

I am indebted to Ruby/Rebecca Lang (my dear girl, you do confuse me) for this fascinating story of giant fish. Max tells me that although the golden colour morph of the common carp (Cyprinus carpio) is known, and so this charming fellow is not unique.

I assumed that it would have been someone like this fish who was the great grand-daddy of the domestic goldfish but peculiarly the goldfish (Carassius auratus) is descended from domesticated forms of the Prussian carp (Carassius gebelio), which doesn’t come from Prussia at all but is a native of various parts of Asia.

Koi, however, are descended from common carp, but this handsome chap is no koi, just an incredibly beautiful colour variant of yer normal Cyprinus carpio. Lovely isn't he?

http://www.iinet.net.au/customers/news/articles/7958330.html