WELCOME TO THE CFZ BLOG NETWORK: COME AND JOIN THE FUN

Half a century ago, Belgian Zoologist Bernard Heuvelmans first codified cryptozoology in his book On the Track of Unknown Animals.

The Centre for Fortean Zoology (CFZ) are still on the track, and have been since 1992. But as if chasing unknown animals wasn't enough, we are involved in education, conservation, and good old-fashioned natural history! We already have three journals, the largest cryptozoological publishing house in the world, CFZtv, and the largest cryptozoological conference in the English-speaking world, but in January 2009 someone suggested that we started a daily online magazine! The CFZ bloggo is a collaborative effort by a coalition of members, friends, and supporters of the CFZ, and covers all the subjects with which we deal, with a smattering of music, high strangeness and surreal humour to make up the mix.

It is edited by CFZ Director Jon Downes, and subbed by the lovely Lizzy Bitakara'mire (formerly Clancy), scourge of improper syntax. The daily newsblog is edited by Corinna Downes, head administratrix of the CFZ, and the indexing is done by Lee Canty and Kathy Imbriani. There is regular news from the CFZ Mystery Cat study group, and regular fortean bird news from 'The Watcher of the Skies'. Regular bloggers include Dr Karl Shuker, Dale Drinnon, Richard Muirhead and Richard Freeman.The CFZ bloggo is updated daily, and there's nothing quite like it anywhere else. Come and join us...

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Thursday, April 16, 2015

DOUG SHOOP SENT THIS: Eaglecam


About Bald Eagles
Once pushed to the brink of extinction, the Bald Eagle has made a powerful comeback since the pesticide DDT was banned in the early 1970s. Minnesota has more Bald Eagles than any other state in the lower 48 states.
News for 2015

This is the third year DNR’s Nongame Wildlife program has streamed live video from a Bald Eagle nest in the Twin Cities metro area. We believe it’s the same pair of eagles that has nested here all those years. This year there are again three eggs in the nest. The first egg was laid on 19th or 20th of January, with all three being laid by the 25th of January. Eagles typically incubate their eggs for about 35 days. Although the nest has at times looked chilly, even covered in a blanket of snow for a while, Bald Eagles in Minnesota have adapted to laying and caring for eggs in these conditions. The male and female take turns keeping their eggs warm and dry in a deep pocket in the middle of the nest. Please check back often to see how the nest is doing, observe interesting behaviors such as parents switching off incubation duties, feeding, and protecting the eggs from the elements.

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