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Half a century ago, Belgian Zoologist Bernard Heuvelmans first codified cryptozoology in his book On the Track of Unknown Animals.

The Centre for Fortean Zoology (CFZ) are still on the track, and have been since 1992. But as if chasing unknown animals wasn't enough, we are involved in education, conservation, and good old-fashioned natural history! We already have three journals, the largest cryptozoological publishing house in the world, CFZtv, and the largest cryptozoological conference in the English-speaking world, but in January 2009 someone suggested that we started a daily online magazine! The CFZ bloggo is a collaborative effort by a coalition of members, friends, and supporters of the CFZ, and covers all the subjects with which we deal, with a smattering of music, high strangeness and surreal humour to make up the mix.

It is edited by CFZ Director Jon Downes, and subbed by the lovely Lizzy Bitakara'mire (formerly Clancy), scourge of improper syntax. The daily newsblog is edited by Corinna Downes, head administratrix of the CFZ, and the indexing is done by Lee Canty and Kathy Imbriani. There is regular news from the CFZ Mystery Cat study group, and regular fortean bird news from 'The Watcher of the Skies'. Regular bloggers include Dr Karl Shuker, Dale Drinnon, Richard Muirhead and Richard Freeman.The CFZ bloggo is updated daily, and there's nothing quite like it anywhere else. Come and join us...

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Friday, February 17, 2012

BIG CAT NEWS: The Coventry Panther and Rothschild Terror Weapons

The hunt for British Big Cats attracts far more newspaper column inches than any other cryptozoological subject.

There are so many of them now that we feel that they should be archived in some way by us, so we should have a go at publishing a regular round-up of the stories as they come in.

It takes a long time to do, and is a fairly tedious task, so I am not promising that they will be done each day, but I will do them as regularly as I can. JD

Coventry Panther returns: Big cat spotted in Ryton Pools
Coventry Telegraph
The latest sighting was on Tuesday last week when a woman said a big cat strolled across her path before heading into Ryton Wood. The 83-acre ancient woodland is home to a flourishing deer population – meaning the illusive feline would have had no...



A "big black enormous thing" in the Midlands. Goodness me! This sighting has been given a cautious endorsement by the authorities.

Hybrid British Big Cats. A Rothschild Terror Weapon?, page 1the beast of bodmin moor has been around since the late 70's early 80's. basically up until a certain point in time in the 70's it was legal to own big cats as pets ...

"The reasonably harmless wild population of cats great and small has been topped up with hybrid Rothschild terror weapons. These will be activated as the bankers run for their escape pods. How are we going to run after the bankers with one of these creatures attached? It's a fiendish plan." This has to be a joke. Right? Reassure me someone.


Big Cat Found in London

The big cats even got their own nicknames much like prolific serial killers (well I suppose they are if you look at it from the sheep and cows point of view), one of ...

This is actually nothing of the sort. It is a random blog posting under the title "Don’t Pet This Kitteh" and containing a link to one of the recent Gloucestershire stories. And finally, another media outing for the recent Gloucestershire sightings..

'Big cat' filmed in Gloucestershire
Shooting times
Video footage released of 'slim, black leopard' near site of deer killings.

1 comment:

Carl said...

I think the footage of the big cat in Glo's probably shows nothing more that a large dark; (maybe melanistic, maybe poor light) red fox, possibly a dog (male) considering the apparent size of the animal. Though I admit at times its gait does look quite feline, but if you watch the footage to its conclusion you get a nice, fairly clear still image of what I believe shows the overall body shape of a red fox beautifully, complete with long belly fur and other typical features.