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Half a century ago, Belgian Zoologist Bernard Heuvelmans first codified cryptozoology in his book On the Track of Unknown Animals.

The Centre for Fortean Zoology (CFZ) are still on the track, and have been since 1992. But as if chasing unknown animals wasn't enough, we are involved in education, conservation, and good old-fashioned natural history! We already have three journals, the largest cryptozoological publishing house in the world, CFZtv, and the largest cryptozoological conference in the English-speaking world, but in January 2009 someone suggested that we started a daily online magazine! The CFZ bloggo is a collaborative effort by a coalition of members, friends, and supporters of the CFZ, and covers all the subjects with which we deal, with a smattering of music, high strangeness and surreal humour to make up the mix.

It is edited by CFZ Director Jon Downes, and subbed by the lovely Lizzy Bitakara'mire (formerly Clancy), scourge of improper syntax. The daily newsblog is edited by Corinna Downes, head administratrix of the CFZ, and the indexing is done by Lee Canty and Kathy Imbriani. There is regular news from the CFZ Mystery Cat study group, and regular fortean bird news from 'The Watcher of the Skies'. Regular bloggers include Dr Karl Shuker, Dale Drinnon, Richard Muirhead and Richard Freeman.The CFZ bloggo is updated daily, and there's nothing quite like it anywhere else. Come and join us...

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Tuesday, December 20, 2011

DIVERSIONARY FEEDING

I am always interested to read about new and alternative conservation strategies. This is one I had never heard of before, but with a little imagination, one can imagine a whole plethora of alternative uses...

Diversionary feeding means providing alternative food, such as carrion, to hen harriers during the two to three months when they are breeding so that they kill fewer red grouse chicks. A short video showing diversionary feeding can be seen here (with thanks to Making the Most of Moorlands).

Preliminary trials carried out at Langholm during 1998 and 1999 showed that the number of grouse chicks taken back to harrier nests could be reduced by up to 86%.However, there was no measurable increase in grouse stock during these years.

Read on...

2 comments:

Dan said...

One trick you might usefully employ locally to where you are in Devon is trying to deliberately feed the local leopard population in Huddisford Woods. The easiest way to do this might be to simply obtain permission to shoot rabbits on local land, and regularly put a shot bunny a few feet up a tree in said woods.

That ought to make it more difficult for a fox to steal the food, and will get the cat used to free grub in the area which smells vaguely of humans. This will make it easier to camera-trap the cat, with luck. All you need now is a source of bunnies...

Syd said...

An even better idea than Dan's, would be to shoot some of the local kids and regularly put them a few feet up a tree in said woods to feed the local leopard population in Huddisford Woods.