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Friday, July 08, 2011

KEN GERHARD VS THE LOCH NESS MONSTER

This image was sent to me by a Yugoslavian man who claims he captured it while viewing the Loch Ness surveillance website. Any feedback would be greatly appreciated...

8 comments:

Dale Drinnon said...

Funny thing he didn't call it a Pterodactyl, since it seems to be associated with the trees and NOT in the water.

Best wishes, Dale D.

Dan said...

Goodness me, even I can come up with a slightly more convincing Loch Ness Monster than that, as the photo I recently sent to Jon adequately demonstrated (and yes, I do know the plesiosaur depicted in said image was anatomically incorrect and that live ones could never stick their heads out of the water like that).

To be quite honest, I don't think that black thing is even in Loch Ness at all; I think it is an insect or a bird dropping on the windowpane through which the observation camera is looking, so is a couple of feet away from the camera, not a mile or so away.

Peter said...

A bird in flight?

D. Ratliff said...

At first glance, I would hazard a bird of some form flying from one tree to the next. But I could be wrong. ;) I'm not a photograph expert or anything.

Glasgow Boy said...

It looks more out of focus than the surrounding vegetation which implies it is a lot closer to the camera. I would say it is something stuck on the lens.

Tabitca said...

Its probably a red kite. There are lots on the Black Isle so not that far for them to fly.I think Sparrow hawks have also been seen around the area.Web cams do seem to make things appear to be something else and you can't focus in as you can with your own camera.

NickJones said...

It would probably be useful to see the bracketing frames before and after, and know what the lapse times are between shots. As it is, I say bird.

Aaron said...

He's sat on it for a month - the data reads Wednesday June 8th and the tents for RockNess are visible in the background. Crows and buzzards are common near the castle so I'd guess one of them. Update time is about 30 secs so other frames probably won't help.
A