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Half a century ago, Belgian Zoologist Bernard Heuvelmans first codified cryptozoology in his book On the Track of Unknown Animals.

The Centre for Fortean Zoology (CFZ) are still on the track, and have been since 1992. But as if chasing unknown animals wasn't enough, we are involved in education, conservation, and good old-fashioned natural history! We already have three journals, the largest cryptozoological publishing house in the world, CFZtv, and the largest cryptozoological conference in the English-speaking world, but in January 2009 someone suggested that we started a daily online magazine! The CFZ bloggo is a collaborative effort by a coalition of members, friends, and supporters of the CFZ, and covers all the subjects with which we deal, with a smattering of music, high strangeness and surreal humour to make up the mix.

It is edited by CFZ Director Jon Downes, and subbed by the lovely Lizzy Bitakara'mire (formerly Clancy), scourge of improper syntax. The daily newsblog is edited by Corinna Downes, head administratrix of the CFZ, and the indexing is done by Lee Canty and Kathy Imbriani. There is regular news from the CFZ Mystery Cat study group, and regular fortean bird news from 'The Watcher of the Skies'. Regular bloggers include Dr Karl Shuker, Dale Drinnon, Richard Muirhead and Richard Freeman.The CFZ bloggo is updated daily, and there's nothing quite like it anywhere else. Come and join us...

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Thursday, January 21, 2010

CHUPACABRA HELP

Calling all of you in bloggoland. The CFZ, and me in particular, need your help. Can any of you find written or recorded usage of the word CHUPACABRA or CHUPACABRAS which pre-dates 1995? Can you let me know if you can find any, and let me have a citation, and preferably a scan of the document in question.


I would also be interested in any accounts of the English words "goat sucker" being used as an insult. I know that it is an old country name for nightjars, which are indeed the most Fortean of birdies, but has it ever meant anything ruder or more scatological?


Now fly, my pretties, and bring me back data....

5 comments:

Tabitca said...

Have emailed you some links Jon. It was first named in 1987 according to the links.
Lxx

lilfeathers2000 said...

check out these news stories:

http://cbs13.com/watercooler/Chupacabra.goat.sucker.2.1434712.html

http://www.kltv.com/Global/story.asp?S=11846896


http://www.newson6.com/Global/story.asp?S=11030731

lilfeathers2000 said...

check out these news stories:

http://cbs13.com/watercooler/Chupacabra.goat.sucker.2.1434712.html

http://www.kltv.com/Global/story.asp?S=11846896


http://www.newson6.com/Global/story.asp?S=11030731

Dale Drinnon said...

As I understand it, before the late 1980s the name was used for a bird called (in English)a goatsucker - nothing mysterious about that.

That the story of some sort of a beast causing animal mutilations was going around a decade before that WITHOUT using the name Chupascratcha or whatever, I have also got positive proof from Folklore. That animal mutilations have been reported for more than a century earlier I also have sources. That there's probably nothing of any especial interest at the bottom of it has been my conclusion for the past several years now.

Dale Drinnon said...

BTW, I also just posted an account from 1998 Mexico which described a large upright lizard, later called a Chupacabras, in the Frontiers of Zoology group. I had heard secondhand reports of the creature from New Mexico or Arizona in the mid-1970s and actually, rumors of a creature described as being like a small tyrannosaur/Allosaurus were circulating around in the Pulp magazine days. L. Taylor Hansen was a pulp fiction writer who believed in the late-survival of such creatures in the Southwestern USA based in part on such things as the "Tyrannosaur" petroglyph at Hava Supai canyon.

The creature is probably NOT a small dinosaur but rather a big lizard: that has not stopped people from imagining creatures such as Gwangi from the rumors that have been in circulation for a long time.