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Half a century ago, Belgian Zoologist Bernard Heuvelmans first codified cryptozoology in his book On the Track of Unknown Animals.

The Centre for Fortean Zoology (CFZ) are still on the track, and have been since 1992. But as if chasing unknown animals wasn't enough, we are involved in education, conservation, and good old-fashioned natural history! We already have three journals, the largest cryptozoological publishing house in the world, CFZtv, and the largest cryptozoological conference in the English-speaking world, but in January 2009 someone suggested that we started a daily online magazine! The CFZ bloggo is a collaborative effort by a coalition of members, friends, and supporters of the CFZ, and covers all the subjects with which we deal, with a smattering of music, high strangeness and surreal humour to make up the mix.

It is edited by CFZ Director Jon Downes, and subbed by the lovely Lizzy Bitakara'mire (formerly Clancy), scourge of improper syntax. The daily newsblog is edited by Corinna Downes, head administratrix of the CFZ, and the indexing is done by Lee Canty and Kathy Imbriani. There is regular news from the CFZ Mystery Cat study group, and regular fortean bird news from 'The Watcher of the Skies'. Regular bloggers include Dr Karl Shuker, Dale Drinnon, Richard Muirhead and Richard Freeman.The CFZ bloggo is updated daily, and there's nothing quite like it anywhere else. Come and join us...

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Thursday, July 23, 2009

MORE TERATOLOGICAL TURTLES

This is rapidly turning out to be the year of the teratological turtles. Yesterday we posted a bizarre halved turtle, and now we have a partial albino softshell:

IT MAY look more like your Christmas turkey just before it goes into the oven, but this milky white creature is actually a rare white turtle.

The creature, whose creamy colour is offset by a few hints of pink, was discovered by the bank of the Yellow River in Henan province, China.

White turtles have a special place in Chinese culture, as the classic novel Journey from the West features an entity from Heaven who is turned into one of the animals after performing ill deeds.

However, unlike the character in the tale, this white turtle won't be ferrying any people across rivers: it is just 40cm long and 6.5kg

1 comment:

Retrieverman said...

I've seen many smooth and spiny soft-shells. The females wander some distance from rivers to lay their eggs, usually just before a good rain.

Now, I've never caught one on land for a very simple reason that they can extremely fast. For an almost entirely aquatic animal, you certainly don't expect that sort of speed.

That albino Chinese soft-shell has something like the spines on the front of its carapace that you would find on a spiny soft-shell (although not as prominent, of course).