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Half a century ago, Belgian Zoologist Bernard Heuvelmans first codified cryptozoology in his book On the Track of Unknown Animals.

The Centre for Fortean Zoology (CFZ) are still on the track, and have been since 1992. But as if chasing unknown animals wasn't enough, we are involved in education, conservation, and good old-fashioned natural history! We already have three journals, the largest cryptozoological publishing house in the world, CFZtv, and the largest cryptozoological conference in the English-speaking world, but in January 2009 someone suggested that we started a daily online magazine! The CFZ bloggo is a collaborative effort by a coalition of members, friends, and supporters of the CFZ, and covers all the subjects with which we deal, with a smattering of music, high strangeness and surreal humour to make up the mix.

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Sunday, May 03, 2009

ANHINGA STORIES

I have just been sent this, and I really don't know what it is. It vaguely reminds me of an anhinga, but I don't think that it is one.


The YouTube blurb reads:

Unknown bird fishing @ Arcadia arboretum (L.A. County)


Recorded July 11, 2007While feeding the fish and turtles at the arboretum lagoon, a persistent unknown bird, (I know electronics, not birds) was going after baby catfish, feeding on bread.He (?) eventually caught one. (No video), but I do have a still photo, of the little fish in its mouth. (beak?)

Whilst on the subject of anhingas, it is a little known fact that for some years one was living in Exminster marshes in South Devon. Back in 2001 a friend of mine from America was visiting Exeter and spent some time with Richard and me. We took the mildly touristy river boad that goes along the canal from Exeter to The Turf Lock a pub out in the marshes. The pilot of the boat was a lady who spent every winter in the Everglades doing something involving manatees, and she pointed the anhinga out to us. That is certainly what it was, although no-one has ever mentioned it before or since...

(For those not aware of these peculiar birds, the lower piece of footage is of an anhinga from You Tube









5 comments:

Richard Freeman said...

Its a night heron.

Retrieverman said...

It looks like a black-crowned night heron.

arecane2000 said...

I think it may be a night heron, the dark crest, dark and thickish bill, and stout ( compared to, say an egret ) build as well as it fishing from above the water instead of swimming after it ( like cormorant or anhinga ) suggest a heron to me.

arecane2000 said...

I think it may be a night heron, the dark crest, dark and thickish bill, and stout ( compared to, say an egret ) build as well as it fishing from above the water instead of swimming after it ( like cormorant or anhinga ) suggest a heron to me.

Herbal Soliloquy said...

A species of cormorant, they are everywhere in Florida.