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Half a century ago, Belgian Zoologist Bernard Heuvelmans first codified cryptozoology in his book On the Track of Unknown Animals.

The Centre for Fortean Zoology (CFZ) are still on the track, and have been since 1992. But as if chasing unknown animals wasn't enough, we are involved in education, conservation, and good old-fashioned natural history! We already have three journals, the largest cryptozoological publishing house in the world, CFZtv, and the largest cryptozoological conference in the English-speaking world, but in January 2009 someone suggested that we started a daily online magazine! The CFZ bloggo is a collaborative effort by a coalition of members, friends, and supporters of the CFZ, and covers all the subjects with which we deal, with a smattering of music, high strangeness and surreal humour to make up the mix.

It is edited by CFZ Director Jon Downes, and subbed by the lovely Lizzy Bitakara'mire (formerly Clancy), scourge of improper syntax. The daily newsblog is edited by Corinna Downes, head administratrix of the CFZ, and the indexing is done by Lee Canty and Kathy Imbriani. There is regular news from the CFZ Mystery Cat study group, and regular fortean bird news from 'The Watcher of the Skies'. Regular bloggers include Dr Karl Shuker, Dale Drinnon, Richard Muirhead and Richard Freeman.The CFZ bloggo is updated daily, and there's nothing quite like it anywhere else. Come and join us...

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Saturday, February 21, 2009

MUIRHEAD`S MYSTERIES: A WHITE HARE IN DEVON AND THE REMAINS OF A HUGE BIRD OFF SIBERIA

I have today come across two new stories from the Macclesfield Courier
and Stockport Express or Cheshire General Advertiser.(MC & SE or CGA)
The first story is about a white hare from Devon,the second is far more
controversial, an account of the remains of a huge bird found on an
island in Arctic waters off the north coast of Siberia. Both stories
are from 1811. A Google search for the name "Hedemstrotni" found
nothing,but "New Siberia" does exist and it was discovered c.1806. Huge
birds have been reported from North America but I was unaware of any
from Siberia. Make of this what you will....

" A white hare was killed last week at Puddington, Devon by the Rev Mr
Hole`s harriers. A similar instance occured about 50 years ago in the
same parish."
MC & SE or CGA October 26th 1811

"Hedemstrotni; the Russian naturalist,who recently examined the newly
discovered Island called New Siberia in the Icy Ocean found on it three
birds claws a yard in length; and the roving Jakute (?) related that
they had sometimes found feathers,the barrels of which were capable of
of admitting a man`s clenched fist
. MC & SE or CGA. November 9th 1811.

Could "Jakute" now mean Yackut,i.e. of the Russian region now known by
that title?

1 comment:

Little Weasel said...

Before around 1800 a J was often used instead of a Y when writing, so it could quite possibly be a transliteration from the Cyrillic, that has used a J instead of a Y.